About Hepatitis

Hepatitis is an inflammation of the liver caused by toxic substances, or viruses (in most cases). To date, 5 viruses causing targeted infection and inflammation of the liver have been identified. These viruses, designated by the letters A, B, C, D, and E, differ in their mode of transmission (fecal-oral for viruses A and E, parenteral for viruses B and C) and their aggressiveness.

HEPATITIS B: MORE THAN 370 MILLION CHRONIC CARRIERS (POTENTIALLY TRANSMITTING THE VIRUS), AND MORE THAN 600,000 ANNUAL DEATHS.

HEPATITIS C: 130 TO 170 MILLION CHRONIC CARRIERS WORLDWIDE, AND NEARLY 350,000ANNUAL DEATHS.

cause

As soon as the viruses reach the liver, they enter the cells, the hepatocytes, and multiply there. The immune system that provides the defenses of the body then destroys the infected cells, which causes inflammation of the liver. Characteristic symptoms of acute inflammation of the liver may be observed during contamination with these viruses and may last for several weeks: yellowing of the skin and eyes (jaundice or jaundice), dark urine, discolored stools, extreme fatigue, nausea, vomiting and abdominal pain. It is impossible to distinguish different forms of hepatitis on the basis of the symptoms of the acute phase of the disease. Unlike hepatitis A and hepatitis E viruses, hepatitis B and hepatitis C viruses can lead to a chronic carriage, serious complications of chronic hepatitis: cirrhosis and liver cancer.

While hepatitis A and B viruses were identified in the 1960s and 1970s, hepatitis C and E viruses, previously referred to as “non-A non-B” hepatitis, were identified more recently in 1989. -1990.